The future of EU enlargement

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There have certainly been better times for EU enlargement. Today, rather than concentrate on its expansion, the EU is preoccupied with a number of other challenges, from the economic-cum-fiscal-debt crisis, to the developments in Ukraine, to military missions old and new.

Not only has EU enlargement been placed on the back burner; for more than half of the South East European aspirants, the process is practically stuck. Macedonia was given the green light for accession negotiations by the European Commission in 2009, but finds its path blocked by Greece, which objects to the country’s official name. Bosnia cannot apply for membership as the EU insists on the implementation of a ruling by the European Court of Human Rights that splits the political leadership. Kosovo, the other Balkan protectorate, is in an even worse position. Given that the EU cannot treat Kosovo as a state – five of its members do not recognise it as such – any formal progress is extremely difficult. Albania’s new government has made promising first steps, but still waits for candidate status and the start of negotiations. Turkey’s negotiations are moving very slowly. Read more …

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ESI reports on EU enlargement Background document library ESI network of Europeanisers Media reactions
ESI reports on EU enlargement Background library ESI network of Europeanisers Media reactions
People Debates on EU enlargement Rethinking enlargement Countries: The EU & …
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