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Veils

This was posted in 1917, the last full year of Austro-Hungarian rule in Bosnia-Hercegovina. It says: "Turkish Picnic". Bosnian Muslims were the widely referred to as Turks. 
Women in Mostar in an undated postcard probably from the 1930s. Note the shoes! 
This was posted in April 1912 but was printed in Sarajevo in 1909. 

The women are dressed suitably for going out in public. The young men are Bosnians serving in the Austro-Hungarian army. They wore fezzes as their distinguishing feature in the army, which comprised many nations. The picture was taken during an outing and the men are either escorting the women or courting them. 

For this caption many thanks to Amra Madzarevic and the Sarajevo Museum.
Veils

Veils were very common amongst Muslim women in Bosnia-Hercegovina until well after the second world war. In the wake of the war the communist authorities and the Antifascist Women's Front of Bosnia-Hercegovina launched campaigns against the veil, and they also enlisted the help of Islamic organisations in the republic. However, as Robert Donia writes in his history of Sarajevo, "the campaign encountered staunch resistance, especially among women outside of Sarajevo and among Muslim men."

Statistics compiled by the women's front showed that 95 percent of Sarajevo's Muslim women had abandoned the veil by late 1950, but fewer than 50 percent had done so in other towns of Bosnia-Herzegovina. Faced with widespread resistance to the unveiling campaign, the Bosnian Assembly resorted to compulsion to end the practice completely. Legislation banning the veil was introduced by Dzemal Bijedic, who was later to become Yugoslavia's prime minister and emissary to non-aligned nations. Passed on September 28, 1950, the law declared a ban on wearing the veil, "with the goal of ending the centuries old symbol of inferiority and cultural backwardness of Muslim women." Violators were subject to fines and to prison sentences of up to three months. Veils soon disappeared in Sarajevo, and resistance to unveiling elsewhere in the republic was gradually overcome as well.

 

Postcard #1

This was posted in April 1912 but was printed in Sarajevo in 1909.

The women are dressed suitably for going out in public. The young men are Bosnians serving in the Austro-Hungarian army. They wore fezzes as their distinguishing feature in the army, which comprised many nations. The picture was taken during an outing and the men are either escorting the women or courting them.

For this caption many thanks to Amra Madzarevic and the Sarajevo Museum.

 

Postcard #2

Women in Mostar in an undated postcard probably from the 1930s. Note the shoes!

 

Postcard #3

This was posted in 1917, the last full year of Austro-Hungarian rule in Bosnia-Hercegovina. It says: "Turkish Picnic". Bosnian Muslims were the widely referred to as Turks.

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