Turkish Policy Quarterly Vol 9, No. 3 (Fall 2010)
"Viewpoints Collide: Shifts in Turkey and Its Neighborhood"

Nigar Göksel

Nigar Göksel
ESI Senior Analyst

From the desk of the editor

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Dimostenis Yağcıoğlu

Dimostenis Yağcıoğlu
Dimostenis Yağcıoğlu is a former scientific consultant for Intercultural and Minority Education at the Ministry of Education, Life-Long Learning and Religious Affairs in Greece.

Reciprocity, a principle that should never be used by a state on its own citizens, has nonetheless been applied by the Greek government to legitimize policies limiting or violating the rights of Turkish-Muslims in Greece, and by the Turkish government to do the same for the Greek-Orthodox in Turkey. Fortunately, the approach of both governments toward reciprocity has recently shown signs of change. Minorities are now considered in a more positive light. Yet, the governments of the two countries appear unwilling to fully abandon reciprocity and take steps to address the demands of minorities. Their rhetoric is insincere and a way to hide this mutual unwillingness.

TPQ-article: "Reciprocal Insincerity: Current Trends in the Treatment of Minorities in Greece and Turkey"

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Mert Tekin

Mert Tekin
Mert Tekin has recently obtained his M.A. degree at Boston University, Department of Intenational Relations.

This article discusses the impact of European integration on minority policies in Greece and Turkey. The history of minorities and the evolution of state policies in Greece and Turkey are examined. The paper argues that minority policies have rested upon the logic of marginalization, intimidation and reciprocity in both countries. However, European integration has provided policymakers in Athens and Ankara with a framework to legitimize their reform policies. Thus, significant improvements in minority policies have taken place in the last two decades, even though shortcomings remain.

TPQ-article: "Rethinking the State of Minorities in Greek - Turkish Relations in Light of European Integration"

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Kader Sevinç

Kader Sevinç
Kader Sevinç is the EU Representative of Turkey's main opposition party, CHP (Republican People's Party) and member of the Presidency committee of the Party of European Socialists.

In the European Union, negotiation is a built-in and indispensable dimension of the decision-making process. There are written rules, unique moves, clearly defined targets and sometimes unexpected results. As for the ongoing negotiations of membership between the EU and Turkey, lack of political leadership and strategic vision on both sides have led the negotiations to become a bit of an enigma, rather than an end-game.

TPQ-article: "How to Negotiate with the EU: Theories and Practice"

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Nareg Seferian

Nareg Seferian
Nareg Seferian is pursuing a degree in liberal arts at St. John's College, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

The issue of the events involving Armenians and Turks at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth century has gained political currency over the past few decades. It involves a number of players: the Republic of Turkey, the organized Armenian Diaspora, the Republic of Armenia, the Armenians of Turkey, the Republic of Azerbaijan, and the nascent émigré groups of Turks and Azerbaijanis in the West. Whereas the Armenian parties must consolidate their efforts and present a united front, the greater onus lies on Turkey as the biggest and most significant player to achieve a lasting resolution.

TPQ-article: "Genocide Politics: Players, Moves and An Endgame"

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Araz Aslanlı

Araz Aslanlı
Araz Aslanlı is head of the Caucasian Center for International Relations and Strategic Studies, and instructor at Khazar University, Baku.

In the historical course of Azerbaijan, Russia has always been perceived as an invader, while Russia considered Azerbaijan as both an opportunity and a threat – an opportunity in the sense that it is a bridge in the region, and a threat as this can also be utilized by other states. As a small and newly independent country, Azerbaijan has not been able to determine its own foreign policy course, but instead tries to balance the foreign powers' demands. If Russia uses the powerful vehicles and tools available to it, not only Azerbaijan's but the stakes of other regional players' stakes will also be under threat.

TPQ-article: "Azerbaijan - Russia Relations: Is Foreign Policy Strategy of Azerbaijan Changing?"

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