On 14 June 1985, the Schengen Agreement on the gradual abolition of checks at the common borders between Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, was signed on board the cruise ship 'Princesse Marie-Astrid', moored at Schengen, Luxembourg. Photo: plaza.lu
On 14 June 1985, the Schengen Agreement on the gradual abolition of checks at the common borders between Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, was signed on board the cruise ship 'Princesse Marie-Astrid', moored at Schengen, Luxembourg. Photo: plaza.lu

How Schengen works

The story of the European border revolution is one of the most interesting examples of EU integration. It is also at the center of the work of Ruben Zaiotti, and his book "Cultures of Border Control: Schengen and the Evolution of European Frontiers" (2011).

Recently Ruben published an article looking at the current debates on Schengen: "The Italo-French Row over Schengen and the Lessons of Past 'Crises' for the Future of Border Free Europe" (June 2011).

And at an ESI conference organised with Erste Stiftung in Vienna in September 2011, Ruben and others discussed the future of the European border revolution. His presentation on the past and future of the Schengen regime is also available as a video:

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Ruben Zaiotti on the past and the future of the Schengen regime. Video: Ruben Zaiotti. All rights reserved.
Schengen monument. Photo: unknown
Schengen monument. Photo: unknown
Celebrations for the Enlargement of the Schengen Area on 21 December 2007. Photo: European Commission Audiovisual service
Celebrations for the Enlargement of the Schengen Area on 21 December 2007.
Photo: European Commission Audiovisual service

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