'Hivzi Sylejmani' - Library (listed since 1967)

The building of the Prishtina City Library was built in 1930. Its claim to fame is Miladin Popovic, the former leader of Kosovo’s Regional Committee of the Communist Party who was accommodated in this house in 1944. Since 1948, the building houses the Prishtina City Library.

Foundations of the Old Hammam (listed since 1959)

Today, nothing is left of the old Hamam, as it disappeared during successive waves of urban renovation. It was once located besides Carshi mosque. Its ruins were discovered during the construction of today’s Government Building; they were considered important examples of early Ottoman town architecture. However, without due research, they were quickly covered up by previous town planners.

Carshi Mosque (Bazaar Mosque, listed since 1967)

Carshi Mosque marks the beginning of the old town center. Built in the early 15th century by Sultan Bayazid to commemorate the victory of the Ottoman forces in 1389, it is the oldest standing building in Prishtina today. In the past, Carshi Mosque overlooked the old covered bazaar of Prishtina. Today, nothing is left of the old bazaar, only the name of Carshi mosque serves as a reminder. Many subsequent changes and repair works have changed the original look of this mosque, but its symbol – the unique stone-topped minaret – has survived for more than 600 years. The mosque is also nicknamed – ‘Tas Mosque’, literally ‘Stone Mosque’.

Shadervan (Fountain, listed since 1967)

Between Carshi Mosque and the Kosovo Museum this decorated marble fountain – known as ‘shadervan’- is the only surviving public fountain of its kind in Prishtina today. In the past, dozens of similar public fountains scattered across the town, provided for refreshment and the possibility of ablution (ritual washing).

Kosovo Museum (listed since 1967)

This Austro-Hungarian inspired building was originally built for the regional administration of the Kosovo Vilajet. From 1945 until 1975 it served as headquarters for the Yugoslav National Army. In 1963, it was sold to the Kosovo Museum. From 1999 until 2002, the European Agency for Reconstruction had its main office in the museum building. The Kosovo Museum has an extensive collection of archaeological and ethnological artifacts. In 1998, more than 1,247 exhibit pieces were taken to Belgrade for an exhibition. The Museum is still waiting for their return.

Jashar Pasha Mosque (listed since 1967)

Jashar Mehmet Pasha was a wealthy citizen of Prishtina. He served as governor of Skopje in 1842. According to inscriptions inside the mosque, the mosque was built in 1834. The original portico was demolished to give way for an expansion of Nazim Gafurri Road passing right in front of the mosque. Overall, the building is suffering from dampness and cracks, infiltrating through cracks in dome.

This protected house is one of a few remaining typical 19th century town houses in Prishtina. After the Second World War, this building was nationalized and became a property of the Cultural Secretariat, the equivalent of today’s Ministry of Culture. The Academy of Arts and Sciences has been located in this buiding since its inception in 1975.

Sahat Kulla (Clock Tower, listed since 1967)

The clock tower dates back to the 19th century. Following a fire, the tower has been reconstructed using bricks. The original bell was brought to Kosovo from Moldavia. It bore an inscription reading ‘this bell was made in 1764 for Jon Moldova Rumen’. In 2001, the original bell was stolen. The same year, French KFOR troops replaced the old clock mechanism with an electric one. Given Kosovo’s electricity problems – the clock tower is struggling to ‘keep time’.

Great Hamam (listed since 1985)

The Great Hamam of Prishtina dates back to the 15th century. It once formed an essential part of the ensemble around Mbretit (Fatih) mosque and served as a social meeting point for both men and women. Legend tells that Sultan Mehmet al-Fatih ordered all workers hired to build Fatih mosque to take daily baths in the Hamam. Following a fire in 1994, the previous regime permitted the construction of three shops effectively closing off the old entrance, and allowing a sewage pipe to run right through the building. Today, little more than a few damaged walls are left, leaving the building in immediate need for protection.

Mbretit Mosque (Sultan Mehmet II al- Fatih Mosque, listed since 1953)

This mosque was built in 1460-1461, only eight years after the fall of Constantinople, by Sultan Mehmet II al-Fatih – the Conqueror. Located right in the heart of the old town center, it is Prishtina’s largest and most prominent mosque. Its cupola was once the biggest in the region, while today it is the last mosque built by Sultan Mehmet II remaining in the Balkans. The square in front of Mbretit Mosque has always been a popular meeting point. In 1682-83, the mosque was restored under the reign of Sultan Mehmet IV, the minaret was repaired again following an earthquake in 1955. The mosque is suffering from deterioration and unprofessional restoration works; bad infrastructure in the area is causing dampness in the walls and deterioration of the stones.

Emin Gjiku Complex (listed since 1955)

This home once belonged to the well-known Gjinolli family. Since 1957 the group of buildings – including the servants’ quarters, the guest house and the family’s private home- belongs to the Kosovo Museum. Emin Gjinolli’s nickname was ‘little man’, or in Turkish ‘Eminçik’. This later became ‘Emin Gjiku’. Just on the left hand side, as one enters the premises, one can find the only building that survived the destruction of the old bazaar. It was moved here in 1963. Until the 1990s, the complex was used as a Natural Museum. In 2003, renovation works started with the help of international donations to turn it into an Ethnological Museum.

Kosovo Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments (listed since 1957)

The building of the Kosovo Institute for the Protection of Monuments is located in the former home of the Kocadishi family. After nationalisation of their private property, the family migrated to Turkey. In 1954, the building was given to the newly established Kosovo Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments.

Hynyler House (listed since 1967)

This private home - a typical Ottoman konak - has been under protection since 1967. The family has recently been trying to take their house off the list of protected monuments.

Iconostasis in Saint Nicolas’s Church and the Archbishop’s Residences (listed since 1956 and 1961, respectively)

Saint Nicolas Church has in recent years been the only active Serbian Orthodox Church in Pristina. Dating back to the 19th century, it was probably constructed by stonemasons from Western Macedonia. The most valuable treasure of the church has been the protected iconostasis of 1840. During the March violence in 2004, the church was set on fire by angry crowds. A temporary roof has since been constructed to prevent further dampening of the walls and damage to the wall paintings. The adjacent buildings belong to the Kosovo Museum. Today, they house the Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning.

Pirinaz Mosque (listed since 1967)

Pirinaz Mosque is made of the same stone as Mbretit (Fatih) Mosque. It was built about a hundred years later, in the second half of the 16th century. Its founder, a man called Piri Nazir, served as Vezir under two Ottoman Sultans. The ‘Stone of Lazar’, located in the garden of the mosque is where according to local legend Prince Lazar was beheaded in 1389. Before being moved to Ravanici monastery, Prince Lazar was buried in Pirinaz Mosque with the permission of Sultan Bayazid.

Jewish Cemetary (listed since 1967)

The Jewish Cemetery is located on top of Tauk Bahqe hill, near Velania. It dates back to the 19th century. At that time, Prishtina’s Jewish Community had about 1,500 members. The cemetery was put under protection in 1967. Back then, it counted 57 tomb stones. Today, the cemetery is in a desolate state. Surrounded by a metal fence, isolated tombstones are scattered between thorny bushes and high grass.

'Tjerrtorja' Archeological Site (listed since 1955)

Tjerrtorja was a Neolithic settlement located on the outskirts of Prishtina. The site was discovered during the construction of the first socially-owned entreprise in Prishtina, a yarn spinning factory. All excavation efforts were halted after the factory was built and the site has never been fully explored.

In this building, the founding meeting for the Youth Communist Party of the Gracanica (Prishtina) district took place in 1941. It was put under protection in 1967 to commemorate the role of the Youth Communist Party in the ‘National Liberation Movement’ in Prishtina town and the surrounding region.

Pirinaz Mosque (listed since 1967)

Pirinaz Mosque is made of the same stone as Mbretit (Fatih) Mosque. It was built about a hundred years later, in the second half of the 16th century. Its founder, a man called Piri Nazir, served as Vezir under two Ottoman Sultans. The ‘Stone of Lazar’, located in the garden of the mosque is where according to local legend Prince Lazar was beheaded in 1389. Before being moved to Ravanici monastery, Prince Lazar was buried in Pirinaz Mosque with the permission of Sultan Bayazid.

Jewish Cemetary (listed since 1967)

The Jewish Cemetery is located on top of Tauk Bahqe hill, near Velania. It dates back to the 19th century. At that time, Prishtina’s Jewish Community had about 1,500 members. The cemetery was put under protection in 1967. Back then, it counted 57 tomb stones. Today, the cemetery is in a desolate state. Surrounded by a metal fence, isolated tombstones are scattered between thorny bushes and high grass.

'Tjerrtorja' Archeological Site (listed since 1955)

Tjerrtorja was a Neolithic settlement located on the outskirts of Prishtina. The site was discovered during the construction of the first socially-owned entreprise in Prishtina, a yarn spinning factory. All excavation efforts were halted after the factory was built and the site has never been fully explored.

In this building, the founding meeting for the Youth Communist Party of the Gracanica (Prishtina) district took place in 1941. It was put under protection in 1967 to commemorate the role of the Youth Communist Party in the ‘National Liberation Movement’ in Prishtina town and the surrounding region.

Iconostasis in Saint Nicolas’s Church and the Archbishop’s Residences (listed since 1956 and 1961, respectively)

Saint Nicolas Church has in recent years been the only active Serbian Orthodox Church in Prishtina. Dating back to the 19th century, it was probably constructed by stonemasons from Western Macedonia. The most valuable treasure of the church has been the protected iconostasis of 1840. During the March violence in 2004, the church was set on fire by angry crowds. A temporary roof has since been constructed to prevent further dampening of the walls and damage to the wall paintings. The adjacent buildings belong to the Kosovo Museum. Today, they house the Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning.

Hynyler House (listed since 1967)

This private home – a typical Ottoman konak - has been under protection since 1967. The family has recently been trying to take their house off the list of protected monuments.

Kosovo Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments (listed since 1957)

The building of the Kosovo Institute for the Protection of Monuments is located in the former home of the Kocadishi family. After nationalisation of their private property, the family migrated to Turkey. In 1954, the building was given to the newly established Kosovo Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments.

Emin Gjiku Complex (listed since 1955)

This home once belonged to the well-known Gjinolli family. Since 1957 the group of buildings – including the servants’ quarters, the guest house and the family’s private home- belongs to the Kosovo Museum. Emin Gjinolli’s nickname was ‘little man’, or in Turkish ‘Eminçik’. This later became ‘Emin Gjiku’. Just on the left hand side, as one enters the premises, one can find the only building that survived the destruction of the old bazaar. It was moved here in 1963. Until the 1990s, the complex was used as a Natural Museum. In 2003, renovation works started with the help of international donations to turn it into an Ethnological Museum.

Sahat Kulla (Clock Tower, listed since 1967)

The clock tower dates back to the 19th century. Following a fire, the tower has been reconstructed using bricks. The original bell was brought to Kosovo from Moldavia. It bore an inscription reading ‘this bell was made in 1764 for Jon Moldova Rumen’. In 2001, the original bell was stolen. The same year, French KFOR troops replaced the old clock mechanism with an electric one. Given Kosovo’s electricity problems – the clock tower is struggling to ‘keep time’.

Mbretit Mosque (Sultan Mehmet II al- Fatih Mosque, listed since 1953)

This mosque was built in 1460-1461, only eight years after the fall of Constantinople, by Sultan Mehmet II al-Fatih – the Conqueror. Located right in the heart of the old town center, it is Prishtina’s largest and most prominent mosque. Its cupola was once the biggest in the region, while today it is the last mosque built by Sultan Mehmet II remaining in the Balkans. The square in front of Mbretit Mosque has always been a popular meeting point. In 1682-83, the mosque was restored under the reign of Sultan Mehmet IV, the minaret was repaired again following an earthquake in 1955. The mosque is suffering from deterioration and unprofessional restoration works; bad infrastructure in the area is causing dampness in the walls and deterioration of the stones.

Jashar Pasha Mosque (listed since 1967)

Jashar Mehmet Pasha was a wealthy citizen of Prishtina. He served as governor of Skopje in 1842. According to inscriptions inside the mosque, the mosque was built in 1834. The original portico was demolished to give way for an expansion of Nazim Gafurri Road passing right in front of the mosque. Overall, the building is suffering from dampness and cracks, infiltrating through cracks in dome.

This protected house is one of a few remaining typical 19th century town houses in Prishtina. After the Second World War, this building was nationalized and became a property of the Cultural Secretariat, the equivalent of today’s Ministry of Culture. The Academy of Arts and Sciences has been located in this buiding since its inception in 1975.

Great Hamam (listed since 1985)

The Great Hamam of Prishtina dates back to the 15th century. It once formed an essential part of the ensemble around Mbretit (Fatih) mosque and served as a social meeting point for both men and women. Legend tells that Sultan Mehmet al-Fatih ordered all workers hired to build Fatih mosque to take daily baths in the Hamam. Following a fire in 1994, the previous regime permitted the construction of three shops effectively closing off the old entrance, and allowing a sewage pipe to run right through the building. Today, little more than a few damaged walls are left, leaving the building in immediate need for protection.

Kosovo Museum (listed since 1967)

This Austro-Hungarian inspired building was originally built for the regional administration of the Kosovo Vilajet. From 1945 until 1975 it served as headquarters for the Yugoslav National Army. In 1963, it was sold to the Kosovo Museum. From 1999 until 2002, the European Agency for Reconstruction had its main office in the museum building. The Kosovo Museum has an extensive collection of archaeological and ethnological artifacts. In 1998, more than 1,247 exhibit pieces were taken to Belgrade for an exhibition. The Museum is still waiting for their return.

Shadervan (Fountain, listed since 1967)

Between Carshi Mosque and the Kosovo Museum this decorated marble fountain - known as 'shadervan'- is the only surviving public fountain of its kind in Pristina today. In the past, dozens of similar public fountains scattered across the town, provided for refreshment and the possibility of ablution (ritual washing).

Carshi Mosque (Bazaar Mosque, listed since 1967)

Carshi Mosque marks the beginning of the old town center. Built in the early 15th century by Sultan Bayazid to commemorate the victory of the Ottoman forces in 1389, it is the oldest standing building in Prishtina today. In the past, Carshi Mosque overlooked the old covered bazaar of Prishtina. Today, nothing is left of the old bazaar, only the name of Carshi mosque serves as a reminder. Many subsequent changes and repair works have changed the original look of this mosque, but its symbol – the unique stone-topped minaret – has survived for more than 600 years. The mosque is also nicknamed – ‘Tas Mosque’, literally ‘Stone Mosque’.

Foundations of the Old Hammam (listed since 1959)

Today, nothing is left of the old Hamam, as it disappeared during successive waves of urban renovation. It was once located besides Carshi mosque. Its ruins were discovered during the construction of today’s Government Building; they were considered important examples of early Ottoman town architecture. However, without due research, they were quickly covered up by previous town planners.

'Hivzi Sylejmani' - Library (listed since 1967)

The building of the Prishtina City Library was built in 1930. Its claim to fame is Miladin Popovic, the former leader of Kosovo’s Regional Committee of the Communist Party who was accommodated in this house in 1944. Since 1948, the building houses the Prishtina City Library.