Back People: Justin McCarthy - Next 
Justin McCarthy
Justin McCarthy

Justin McCarthy, an American historian, made his name writing on the expulsion of Ottoman Muslims Turks from the Balkans and the Caucasus in the 19th and early 20th centuries. As he put it in the Introduction of his book Death and Exile:

"Not only during World War I, but all through the nineteenth century, the Muslim peoples of Anatolia, the Crimea, the Balkans, and the Caucasus had suffered overwhelming mortality. Their losses were worthy of further research … It is a history of Muslim suffering, not because Muslims alone suffered, but because a corrective is needed to the traditional one-sided view of the history of the Turks and the Muslims of these regions." 

He sets out to explore what he calls the story of one of history's great migrations:

"In 1800 a vast Muslim land existed in Anatolia, the Balkans, and southern Russia. It was not only a land in which Muslims ruled, but a land in which Muslims were a majority or, in much of the Balkans and part of the Caucasus, a sizeable minority. It included the Crimea and its hinterlands, most of the Caucasus regions, eastern as well as western Anatolia, and southeastern Europe from Albania and Bosnia to the Black sea, almost all of which was within the Ottoman Empire. … By 1923, only Anatolia, eastern thrace, and a section of the southeastern Caucasus remained of the Muslim land. The Balkan Muslims were largely gone, dead or forced to migrate, the remainder living in pockets of settlement in Greece, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia. The same fate had overcome the Muslims of the Crimea, the northern Caucasus, and Russian Armenia

August 2009

 Back People: Justin McCarthy - Next