EU flags at the Croatian Parliament. Photo: flickr/Martin Deutsch
EU flags at the Croatian Parliament. Photo: flickr/Martin Deutsch

Croatia

Croatia is one of the biggest success stories of South Eastern Europe. On 9 December 2011 the country signed an accession treaty with the European Union – twenty years after it fought a bloody war for independence from Yugoslavia and a decade after the death of its wartime leader Franjo Tudjman, a man of nationalist stands and dubious democratic credentials.

Home to 4.3 million people, Croatia is set to become the EU's 28th member on 1 July 2013.

Croatia's recent history shows that South East European states – despite a history of conflict and initially mismanaged transitions – can change dramatically in a relatively short time.

For Croatia, the change began in 2000 with the election of a pro-Western government. Within three years, a national consensus had emerged: the mainstream political parties supported EU membership and were ready to do everything to achieve it.

In order to qualify for EU membership, Croatia had to transform radically, shedding off layers of past identity, abandoning some of its most important national icons and – during the six-year-long accession negotiations – swallowing a healthy dose of bitter EU medicine. Read more …

 
The difference leadership makes. Lessons from Croatia's EU accession process
Croatia's EU accession
 
ESI Croatia film
ESI Croatia film. Photo: Nikolaus Geyrhalter Filmproduktion GmbH
     
 
Slovenia's veto
Slovenia's veto
 
Croatia. Photo: flickr/Ralf Heid
Croatia. Photo: flickr/Ralf Heid
     

People

 

Basic facts

 

Background documents

 

Literary walk

People   Basic facts   Background documents   Literary walk

 

     
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